Help! Installing MAMP + CF8 on Leopard

Ok, some help needed here:

I have a brand new Mac Pro at work; Running the latest and greatest version of OSX with all the security updates etc.

So I need to install CF locally, and have already installed MAMP.
MAMP I got working with no problems, and running on the default ports for MySQL + Apache.

Installed CF8, 64bit edition, and when installing, did the single server instance. I can’t remember if I specified the built in webserver, or tried to point it to MAMP, but post installation, I had nothing in the web server config, so set up the web server connector as follows:

jrun Host: localhost
jrun Server: ColdFusion
Web Server: Apache
Configuration Directory: /Applications/MAMP/conf/apache
Configure web server for ColdFusion 8 Applications: ticked

And in Advanced:

Enable verbose logging for connector: unticked
Enable native OS memory allocator: unticked
Build Apache module from source using APache eXtenSion tool: unticked
Directory and file name of server binary: /Applications/MAMP/bin/apache2/bin/httpd
Directory and file name of server control script: /Applications/MAMP/bin/apache2/bin/apachectl

Now, when I try and start MAMP, mySQL runs, but Apache itself won’t start.
I’ve checked that CF has written the appropriate lines into the http.conf file, which it has – it’s added the .cfm extensions etc.

When I try and start Apache via Terminal, I get this:

Syntax error on line 1114 of /Applications/MAMP/conf/apache/httpd.conf:
Cannot load /Applications/ColdFusion8/runtime/lib/wsconfig/1/mod_jrun20.so into server: cannot create object file image or add library

“mod_jrun20.so” does exist in that location.

Any ideas what to try next?

**update**
Now solved! – installed the 32bit version instead of the 64bit version, as MAMP ain’t got enough bits. 🙂
Thanks to Stephen Erat!

Good things, Ning.

I was initially skeptical about Ning – whose claims of being able to create your own social network without programming knowledge seemed a bit optimistic.

I take it all back. I finally got around to creating a network for a project which I was consulting on, and I’m really impressed. I think I got the whole thing up and running in about 6 minutes.

Obviously, that’s without much in the way of customisation, and I had the logo all done beforehand etc. but still, that’s pretty quick.

So Ning Pros:

  • Stupidly fast to set up
  • Initial site free
  • You can request the source code for customising – although you’re then on your own in terms of code updates
  • Good use of Groups/Forums/Social Profiling, and user management – you can lock down the whole thing to registered users if you want
  • Quite simply, this will do *most* people, if they want some community based system

Cons:

  • not so much a con, but you have to pay to remove adverts, use your own domain or subdomain, add extra bandwidth (100GB per month) etc – they’ve got to make their money somewhere I guess.
  • Every event seems to require a picture of some description, which seems pointless.
  • Some people are happy on facebook, and don’t want yet another social network

I’ve yet to really delve into the inner workings, APIs etc, but it seems all sensibly thought out so far.. Now if it was only written in CF…

Ray Camden on ColdFusion Certifications

Ray’s post on ColdFusion Certifications is pretty spot on: The one problem, on top of those outlined by Ray, that I’ve had over the years, is that very few certification courses have a decent break down on what exactly they expect you know.

Combined with the fact that there are so many features in CF which I’ll never need to touch, like exchange integration etc (well, not yet at least) that I fear the weighting in such an exam wouldn’t sit in my favour.

Perhaps they should move onto a peer review model where some assesses an application you’ve written? To me, that would prove you can a) analyse a problem b) come up with a solution and c) implement the solution in CF, along with the necessary skills such as MySQL.

UniForm Custom Tags V2 released

Pleasingly, a customtag library I’ve been using has had an update: Uni-Form XHTML Forms See here

I hate styling forms. This really has made my life easier (and when you write your own CMS systems as I do, there’s a *lot* of forms)…